What is the only character in film that has won two different actors the Academy Award?

Answer: Vito Corleone is a fictional character in Mario Puzo’s novel The Godfather and in the first two of Francis Ford Coppola’s three Godfather films, in which, in later life, he is portrayed by Marlon Brando in The Godfather and then, as a young man, by Robert De Niro in The Godfather Part II. Both performances won Academy Awards — Best Actor for Brando, Best Supporting Actor for De Niro. Vito Corleone is the only motion picture character played by two different actors, to be awarded an Oscar for the portrayals. Premiere Magazine listed Vito Corleone as the greatest film character in history.

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Tuesday, February 6, 2018

10:25 AM

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Watch how a father used YouTube to make his daughter a better prosthetic eye.

Answer for Watch how a father used YouTube to make his daughter a better prosthetic eye.

Watch how a father used YouTube to make his daughter a better prosthetic eye. | Google

Monday, February 5, 2018

8:59 PM

Clipped from: https://www.google.com/intl/en/about/stories/eyes/

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When Dwayne Collins’ daughter Liberty was born with a rare eye condition, they struggled to find a prosthetic eye that didn’t cause her pain. So Dwayne took matters into his own hands.

Liberty Collins was born with microphthalmia, which causes partial blindness and left her with one eye significantly smaller than the other. She was in immediate need of a prosthesis, as the pressure from the eyes assists with facial growth during early childhood. A prosthetic eye is not just cosmetic – without one, the face doesn’t grow evenly. After two years of visiting clinics in Australia and New Zealand, the family struggled to find a prosthetic eye that fit Liberty properly. One fitting was so traumatizing, Liberty almost passed out.

“What if I made an eye for Liberty myself, only better?” Dwayne Collins

That’s when Dwayne, a former oil rig worker with no previous medical experience, found a YouTube video from John Pacey-Lowrie, a renowned British ocularist, which detailed his process of making prosthetic eyes. Dwayne watched the video on repeat, and after setting up his own makeshift clinic inside the shed in his backyard, he started to practice.

The iris of a prosthetic eye is painted by hand to appear as life-like as possible. The prosthesis is molded to each patient’s eye socket to help maintain proper facial growth.

The job of an ocularist is somewhat of a fine art, requiring an alchemy of mechanical skill, painstaking attention to detail, and artistry. It’s not enough to simply craft a prosthesis that fits – the goal is to make it look as flawless as possible.

“If I don’t share my knowledge, what was the point of gaining it?” John Pacey-Lowrie

The method John teaches in his videos is unique. He starts by taking an impression of the eye socket, and then shapes the implant out of wax using a similar method dentists use for prosthetic teeth.

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The iris is painted by hand, one stroke at a time, and the veins are crafted using a piece of silk cotton thread. The entire process from start to finish takes 3 days. John continues to broadcast what he’s learned on YouTube, to inspire the Ocularist community and draw more people into the field.

It took Dwayne 6 months of training on his own before he was able to craft a beautiful prosthetic eye he felt was good enough for Liberty. After this initial success, he decided to turn this newfound passion of eye making into a profession, spending his life savings training as John’s apprentice in the UK.

“I want to change the way the patient is dealt with. And I don’t want other kids to go through the hell Liberty did,” Dwayne says.

Watch the film to learn more about Dwayne’s journey.

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FaZe Clan Reveal Training of KSI with MMA Fighter FaZe Sensei – Trending in Google

Answer for FaZe Clan Reveal Training of KSI with MMA Fighter FaZe Sensei – Trending in Google

FaZe Clan Reveal Training of KSI with MMA Fighter FaZe Sensei

Sunday, February 4, 2018

9:05 AM

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Following the conclusion of the KSI vs Joe Weller boxing match, esports organization and YouTube content team FaZe Clan released a video showcasing the training regime ‘behind the win’ of KSI.

The bout took place on the evening of Saturday 3rd February, and attracted a huge viewership, hitting over a million concurrent on the YouTube live streams as the two stars took to the ring.

The fight lasted only three of the six scheduled rounds, with KSI punishing Joe Weller to the point of requiring the referee to put a stop to it, as his opponent looked completely out of the contest.

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Shortly after millions watched the fight go down, FaZe released the behind the scenes footage of KSI in training. He had been putting in the gruelling hours with FaZe Sensei, real life MMA fighter Isiah Ocasio.

Clearly the training paid off, as Joe Weller was simply not a match for KSI, who looked comfortable and in control throughout the entire three rounds.

You put in the work bro! You didn’t cut corners. pic.twitter.com/JPdwDuJc0q

— Isiah Ocasio (@FaZe_Sensei) February 3, 2018

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The video put out by FaZe, recaps the victor’s transformation from YouTuber to in shape boxer. The 26 minute long piece documents the trials and tribulations of KSI’s training, clearly showing he wasn’t taking the fight lightly.

MMA fighter Isiah “Sensei” Ocasio came into the FaZe Clan fold after striking friendship with Co-founder and Owner Temperrr, and also trained him for a time.

You can watch the full video below from FaZe Clan, outlining the intense training ahead of the bout.

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This Is Why Uma Thurman Is Angry – uma thurman quentin tarantino

Answer for This Is Why Uma Thurman Is Angry – uma thurman quentin tarantino

This Is Why Uma Thurman Is Angry – uma thurman quentin tarantino

Sunday, February 4, 2018

3:40 AM

Clipped from: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/03/opinion/sunday/this-is-why-uma-thurman-is-angry.html

Cover Photo

Uma Thurman in New York. Credit Damon Winter/The New York Times

The actress is finally ready to talk about Harvey Weinstein.

Yes, Uma Thurman is mad.

She has been raped. She has been sexually assaulted. She has been mangled in hot steel. She has been betrayed and gaslighted by those she trusted.

And we’re not talking about her role as the blood-spattered bride in “Kill Bill.” We’re talking about a world that is just as cutthroat, amoral, vindictive and misogynistic as any Quentin Tarantino hellscape.

We’re talking about Hollywood, where even an avenging angel has a hard time getting respect, much less bloody satisfaction.

Playing foxy Mia Wallace in 1994’s “Pulp Fiction” and ferocious Beatrix Kiddo in “Kill Bill,” Volumes 1 (2003) and 2 (2004), Thurman was the lissome goddess in the creation myth of Harvey Weinstein and Quentin Tarantino. The Miramax troika was the ultimate in indie cool. A spellbound Tarantino often described his auteur-muse relationship with Thurman — who helped him conceive the idea of the bloody bride — as an Alfred Hitchcock-Ingrid Bergman legend. (With a foot fetish thrown in.) But beneath the glistening Oscar gold, there was a dark undercurrent that twisted the triangle.

Continue reading the main story

“Pulp Fiction” made Weinstein rich and respected, and Thurman says he introduced her to President Barack Obama at a fund-raiser as the reason he had his house.

“The complicated feeling I have about Harvey is how bad I feel about all the women that were attacked after I was,” she told me one recent night, looking anguished in her elegant apartment in River House on Manhattan’s East Side, as she vaped tobacco, sipped white wine and fed empty pizza boxes into the fireplace.

“I am one of the reasons that a young girl would walk into his room alone, the way I did. Quentin used Harvey as the executive producer of ‘Kill Bill,’ a movie that symbolizes female empowerment. And all these lambs walked into slaughter because they were convinced nobody rises to such a position who would do something illegal to you, but they do.”

Thurman stresses that Creative Artists Agency, her former agency, was connected to Weinstein’s predatory behavior. It has since issued a public apology. “I stand as both a person who was subjected to it and a person who was then also part of the cloud cover, so that’s a super weird split to have,” she says.

She talks mordantly about “the power from ‘Pulp,’” and reminds me that it’s in the Library of Congress, part of the American narrative.

Photo

Uma Thurman as Mia Wallace in Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 film, “Pulp Fiction.” Harvey Weinstein was an executive producer. Credit Miramax Films

When asked about the scandal on the red carpet at the October premiere for her Broadway play, “The Parisian Woman,” an intrigue about a glamorous woman in President Trump’s Washington written by “House of Cards” creator Beau Willimon, she looked steely and said she was waiting to feel less angry before she talked about it.

“I used the word ‘anger’ but I was more worried about crying, to tell you the truth,” she says now. “I was not a groundbreaker on a story I knew to be true. So what you really saw was a person buying time.”

By Thanksgiving, Thurman had begun to unsheathe her Hattori Hanzo, Instagramming a screen shot of her “roaring rampage of revenge” monologue and wishing everyone a happy holiday, “(Except you Harvey, and all your wicked conspirators — I’m glad it’s going slowly — you don’t deserve a bullet) — stay tuned.”

Stretching out her lanky frame on a brown velvet couch in front of the fire, Thurman tells her story, with occasional interruptions from her 5-year-old daughter with her ex, financier Arpad Busson. Luna is in her pj’s, munching on a raw cucumber. Her two older kids with Ethan Hawke, Maya, an actress, and Levon, a high school student, also drop by.

In interviews over the years, Thurman has offered a Zen outlook — even when talking about her painful breakup from Hawke. (She had a brief first marriage to Gary Oldman.) Her hall features a large golden Buddha from her parents in Woodstock; her father, Robert Thurman, is a Buddhist professor of Indo-Tibetan studies at Columbia who thinks Uma is a reincarnated goddess.

But beneath that reserve and golden aura, she has learned to be a street fighter.

She says when she was 16, living in a studio apartment in Manhattan and starting her movie career, she went to a club one winter night and met an actor, nearly 20 years older, who coerced her afterward when they went to his Greenwich Village brownstone for a nightcap.

“I was ultimately compliant,” she remembers. “I tried to say no, I cried, I did everything I could do. He told me the door was locked but I never ran over and tried the knob. When I got home, I remember I stood in front of the mirror and I looked at my hands and I was so mad at them for not being bloody or bruised. Something like that tunes the dial one way or another, right? You become more compliant or less compliant, and I think I became less compliant.”

Thurman got to know Weinstein and his first wife, Eve, in the afterglow of “Pulp Fiction.” “I knew him pretty well before he attacked me,” she said. “He used to spend hours talking to me about material and complimenting my mind and validating me. It possibly made me overlook warning signs. This was my champion. I was never any kind of studio darling. He had a chokehold on the type of films and directors that were right for me.”

Things soon went off-kilter in a meeting in his Paris hotel room. “It went right over my head,” she says. They were arguing about a script when the bathrobe came out.

“I didn’t feel threatened,” she recalls. “I thought he was being super idiosyncratic, like this was your kooky, eccentric uncle.”

He told her to follow him down a hall — there were always, she says, “vestibules within corridors within chambers” — so they could keep talking. “Then I followed him through a door and it was a steam room. And I was standing there in my full black leather outfit — boots, pants, jacket. And it was so hot and I said, ‘This is ridiculous, what are you doing?’ And he was getting very flustered and mad and he jumped up and ran out.”

The first “attack,” she says, came not long after in Weinstein’s suite at the Savoy Hotel in London. “It was such a bat to the head. He pushed me down. He tried to shove himself on me. He tried to expose himself. He did all kinds of unpleasant things. But he didn’t actually put his back into it and force me. You’re like an animal wriggling away, like a lizard. I was doing anything I could to get the train back on the track. My track. Not his track.”

She was staying in Fulham with her friend, Ilona Herman, Robert De Niro’s longtime makeup artist, who later worked with Thurman on “Kill Bill.”

“The next day to her house arrived a 26-inch-wide vulgar bunch of roses,” Thurman says. “They were yellow. And I opened the note like it was a soiled diaper and it just said, ‘You have great instincts.’” Then, she says, Weinstein’s assistants started calling again to talk about projects.

She thought she could confront him and clear it up, but she took Herman with her and asked Weinstein to meet her in the Savoy bar. The assistants had their own special choreography to lure actresses into the spider’s web and they pressured Thurman, putting Weinstein on the phone to again say it was a misunderstanding and “we have so many projects together.” Finally she agreed to go upstairs, while Herman waited on a settee outside the elevators.

Once the assistants vanished, Thurman says, she warned Weinstein, “If you do what you did to me to other people you will lose your career, your reputation and your family, I promise you.” Her memory of the incident abruptly stops there.

Through a representative, Weinstein, who is in therapy in Arizona, agreed that “she very well could have said this.”

Downstairs, Herman was getting nervous. “It seemed to take forever,” the friend told me. Finally, the elevator doors opened and Thurman walked out. “She was very disheveled and so upset and had this blank look,” Herman recalled. “Her eyes were crazy and she was totally out of control. I shoveled her into the taxi and we went home to my house. She was really shaking.” Herman said that when the actress was able to talk again, she revealed that Weinstein had threatened to derail her career.

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Through a spokesperson, Weinstein denied ever threatening her prospects and said that he thought she was “a brilliant actress.” He acknowledged her account of the episodes but said that up until the Paris steam room, they had had “a flirtatious and fun working relationship.”

“Mr. Weinstein acknowledges making a pass at Ms. Thurman in England after misreading her signals in Paris,” the statement said. “He immediately apologized.”

Thurman says that, even though she was in the middle of a run of Miramax projects, she privately regarded Weinstein as an enemy after that. One top Hollywood executive who knew them both said the work relationship continued but that basically, “She didn’t give him the time of day.”

Thurman says that she could tolerate the mogul in supervised environments and that she assumed she had “aged out of the window of his assault range.”

She attended the party he had in SoHo in September for Tarantino’s engagement to Daniella Pick, an Israeli singer. In response to queries about Thurman’s revelations, Weinstein sent along six pictures of chummy photos of the two of them at premieres and parties over the years.

And that brings us to “the Quentin of it all,” as Thurman calls it. The animosity between Weinstein and Thurman infected her creative partnership with Tarantino.

Married to Hawke and with a baby daughter and a son on the way, Thurman went to the Cannes Film Festival in 2001. She says Tarantino noticed after a dinner that she was skittish around Weinstein, which was a problem, since they were all about to make “Kill Bill.” She says she reminded Tarantino that she had already told him about the Savoy incident, but “he probably dismissed it like ‘Oh, poor Harvey, trying to get girls he can’t have,’ whatever he told himself, who knows?” But she reminded him again and “the penny dropped for him. He confronted Harvey.”

Later, by the pool under the Cypress trees at the luxurious Hotel du Cap, Thurman recalls, Weinstein said he was hurt and surprised by her accusations. She then firmly reiterated what happened in London. “At some point, his eyes changed and he went from aggressive to ashamed,” she says, and he offered her an apology with many of the sentiments he would trot out about 16 years later when the walls caved in.

“I just walked away stunned, like ‘O.K., well there’s my half-assed apology,’” Thurman says.

Weinstein confirmed Friday that he apologized, an unusual admission from him, which spurred Thurman to wryly note, “His therapy must be working.”

Since the revelations about Weinstein became public last fall, Thurman has been reliving her encounters with him — and a gruesome episode on location for “Kill Bill” in Mexico made her feel as blindsided as the bride and as determined to get her due, no matter how long it took.

With four days left, after nine months of shooting the sadistic saga, Thurman was asked to do something that made her draw the line.

In the famous scene where she’s driving the blue convertible to kill Bill — the same one she put on Instagram on Thanksgiving — she was asked to do the driving herself.

But she had been led to believe by a teamster, she says, that the car, which had been reconfigured from a stick shift to an automatic, might not be working that well.

She says she insisted that she didn’t feel comfortable operating the car and would prefer a stunt person to do it. Producers say they do not recall her objecting.

“Quentin came in my trailer and didn’t like to hear no, like any director,” she says. “He was furious because I’d cost them a lot of time. But I was scared. He said: ‘I promise you the car is fine. It’s a straight piece of road.’” He persuaded her to do it, and instructed: “ ‘Hit 40 miles per hour or your hair won’t blow the right way and I’ll make you do it again.’ But that was a deathbox that I was in. The seat wasn’t screwed down properly. It was a sand road and it was not a straight road.” (Tarantino did not respond to requests for comment.)

Thurman then shows me the footage that she says has taken her 15 years to get. “Solving my own Nancy Drew mystery,” she says.

It’s from the point of view of a camera mounted to the back of the Karmann Ghia. It’s frightening to watch Thurman wrestle with the car, as it drifts off the road and smashes into a palm tree, her contorted torso heaving helplessly until crew members appear in the frame to pull her out of the wreckage. Tarantino leans in and Thurman flashes a relieved smile when she realizes that she can briefly stand.

Play Video 1:47 A Crash on the Set of ‘Kill Bill’

Video

A Crash on the Set of ‘Kill Bill’

Uma Thurman said she didn’t want to drive this car. She said she had been warned that there were issues with it. She felt she had to do it anyway. It took her some 15 years to get footage of the crash. (Note: There is no audio.)

Publish Date February 2, 2018. .

“The steering wheel was at my belly and my legs were jammed under me,” she says. “I felt this searing pain and thought, ‘Oh my God, I’m never going to walk again,’” she says. “When I came back from the hospital in a neck brace with my knees damaged and a large massive egg on my head and a concussion, I wanted to see the car and I was very upset. Quentin and I had an enormous fight, and I accused him of trying to kill me. And he was very angry at that, I guess understandably, because he didn’t feel he had tried to kill me.”

Even though their marriage was spiraling apart, Hawke immediately left the Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky to fly to his wife’s side.

“I approached Quentin in very serious terms and told him that he had let Uma down as a director and as a friend,” he told me. He said he told Tarantino, “Hey, man, she is a great actress, not a stunt driver, and you know that.” Hawke added that the director “was very upset with himself and asked for my forgiveness.”

Two weeks after the crash, after trying to see the car and footage of the incident, she had her lawyer send a letter to Miramax, summarizing the event and reserving the right to sue.

Miramax offered to show her the footage if she signed a document “releasing them of any consequences of my future pain and suffering,” she says. She didn’t.

Thurman says her mind meld with Tarantino was rattled. “We were in a terrible fight for years,” she explains. “We had to then go through promoting the movies. It was all very thin ice. We had a fateful fight at Soho House in New York in 2004 and we were shouting at each other because he wouldn’t let me see the footage and he told me that was what they had all decided.”

Now, so many years after the accident, inspired by the reckoning on violence against women, reliving her own “dehumanization to the point of death” in Mexico, and furious that there have not been more legal repercussions against Weinstein, Thurman says she handed over the result of her own excavations to the police and ramped up the pressure to cajole the crash footage out of Tarantino.

“Quentin finally atoned by giving it to me after 15 years, right?” she says. “Not that it matters now, with my permanently damaged neck and my screwed-up knees.”

(Tarantino aficionados spy an echo of Thurman’s crash in his 2007 movie, “Death Proof,” produced by Weinstein and starring Thurman’s stunt double, Zoë Bell. Young women, including a blond Rose McGowan, die in myriad ways, including by slamming into a windshield.)

As she sits by the fire on a second night when we talk until 3 a.m., tears begin to fall down her cheeks. She brushes them away.

“When they turned on me after the accident,” she says, “I went from being a creative contributor and performer to being like a broken tool.”

Thurman says that in “Kill Bill,” Tarantino had done the honors with some of the sadistic flourishes himself, spitting in her face in the scene where Michael Madsen is seen on screen doing it and choking her with a chain in the scene where a teenager named Gogo is on screen doing it.

“Harvey assaulted me but that didn’t kill me,” she says. “What really got me about the crash was that it was a cheap shot. I had been through so many rings of fire by that point. I had really always felt a connection to the greater good in my work with Quentin and most of what I allowed to happen to me and what I participated in was kind of like a horrible mud wrestle with a very angry brother. But at least I had some say, you know?” She says she didn’t feel disempowered by any of it. Until the crash.

“Personally, it has taken me 47 years to stop calling people who are mean to you ‘in love’ with you. It took a long time because I think that as little girls we are conditioned to believe that cruelty and love somehow have a connection and that is like the sort of era that we need to evolve out of.”

I invite you to follow me on Twitter (@MaureenDowd) and join me on Facebook.

Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTopinion), and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter.

A version of this op-ed appears in print on February 4, 2018, on Page SR1 of the New York edition with the headline: A Goddess, A Mogul And a Mad Genius. Today’s Paper|Subscribe

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Uma Thurman shares dramatic video of Kill Bill crash

Answer for Uma Thurman shares dramatic video of Kill Bill crash

Uma Thurman shares dramatic video of Kill Bill crash | Daily Mail Online

Sunday, February 4, 2018

3:38 AM

Clipped from:

Uma Thurman has shared details of a crash which occurred on the set of Kill Bill in 2002 which was the result of a dangerous stunt she says Quentin Tarantino forced her to perform against her will.

The 47-year-old actress revealed the incident in an article with The New York Times on Saturday and provided video footage of it which she says Tarantino has been withholding from her for 15 years but finally gave her recently.

It shows her struggling to keep control of a convertible Karmann Ghia then crashing into a palm tree and lying completely still for several seconds as crew hands then Tarantino himself rush over.

Thurman says she thought she was paralyzed by the stunt and that she had begged Tarantino not to make her perform it.

His refusal to listen to her and his alleged coldness to her afterwards felt like ‘dehumanization to the point of death’.

She said it was indicative of the mistreatment she received by Tarantino and Harvey Weinstein, who she claimed for the first time on Saturday tried to force himself on her, during their iconic working relationship.

The incident occurred in Mexico in 2002 as they finished filming for Kill Bill Vol. 1. It would later be split into two parts by Weinstein who was the producer.

The scene in question is the famous moment Thurman’s character at the end of the first film along a winding road.

Thurman did not reveal on Saturday whether the finished article was genuinely her driving down a road. She shared a screen grab of it on Instagram in November when she threatened to expose Weinstein for his alleged misconduct of her.

She was hesitant about filming it herself and wanted a stunt double to do the difficult driving because, she claimed, the car was unsafe.

It had been reconfigured to from a stick-shift to an automatic and Thurman claimed a crew member expressed concern to her that it was not working properly.

‘Quentin came in my trailer and didn’t like to hear no, like any director.

‘He was furious because I’d cost them a lot of time. But I was scared. He said: “I promise you the car is fine. It’s a straight piece of road.”

“Hit 40 miles per hour or your hair won’t blow the right way and I’ll make you do it again.”

‘But that was a deathbox that I was in. The seat wasn’t screwed down properly. It was a sand road and it was not a straight road,’ she said.

In the footage she provided to the Times, Thurman is seen ploughing into a palm tree then lying back motionless in the immediate aftermath.

Crew members and Tarantino rushed over and got her head, bringing her a bottle of water and speaking to her to calm her down.

She had to be carried off set and was taken to hospital.

‘The steering wheel was at my belly and my legs were jammed under me.

‘I felt this searing pain and thought, “Oh my God, I’m never going to walk again,”’.

‘When I came back from the hospital in a neck brace with my knees damaged and a large massive egg on my head and a concussion, I wanted to see the car and I was very upset.

‘Quentin and I had an enormous fight, and I accused him of trying to kill me. And he was very angry at that, I guess understandably, because he didn’t feel he had tried to kill me,’ she said.

For years, they continued to fight over it and she begged him to show her the footage but he always refused. Ethan Hawke, her husband at the time, corroborated her account.

‘I approached Quentin in very serious terms and told him that he had let Uma down as a director and as a friend.’ He said Tarantino was ‘very upset’ and ‘asked for his forgiveness.’

Afterwards, Thurman’s lawyer sent a letter to Miramax demanding a copy of the video.

They refused to give it to her unless she agreed that she would not hold the production company accountable for ‘future pain or suffering’.

I felt this searing pain and thought, “Oh my God, I’m never going to walk again”

Thurman refused to agree to those terms and has, for the last 15 years, been trying to get the footage from Tarantino himself.

The issue has been a thorn in their friendship and working relationship, she said.

‘We were in a terrible fight for years. We had to then go through promoting the movies. It was all very thin ice.

‘We had a fateful fight at Soho House in New York in 2004 and we were shouting at each other because he wouldn’t let me see the footage and he told me that was what they had all decided,’ she said.

After the Weinstein scandal broke, Tarantino gave it to her. She equates it with him ‘atoning’ for the danger he put her in and the pair are on good terms.

‘Quentin finally atoned by giving it to me after 15 years, right? Not that it matters now, with my permanently damaged neck and my screwed-up knees.’

She has since handed it along with her correspondence with Miramax to police in the hope that they will be held accountable.

The row left her feeling belittled by Miramax, Weinstein and Tarantino.

‘Harvey assaulted me but that didn’t kill me.

‘What really got me about the crash was that it was a cheap shot. I had been through so many rings of fire by that point.

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‘I had really always felt a connection to the greater good in my work with Quentin and most of what I allowed to happen to me and what I participated in was kind of like a horrible mud wrestle with a very angry brother.

‘But at least I had some say, you know?’

Representatives for Tarantino did not respond to DailyMail.com’s requests on Saturday morning nor did Miramax.

In her interview, Thurman also claimed that she was sexually attacked by Weinstein in London’s Savoy Hotel, sometime after they became acquaintances while promoting Pulp Fiction.

‘Harvey assaulted me but that didn’t kill me. ‘What really got me about the crash was that it was a cheap shot. I had been through so many rings of fire by that point.

‘It was such a bat to the head. He pushed me down. He tried to shove himself on me.

‘He tried to expose himself. He did all kinds of unpleasant things. But he didn’t actually put his back into it and force me.

‘You’re like an animal wriggling away, like a lizard. I was doing anything I could to get the train back on the track. My track. Not his track,’ she said.

On a previous occasion, she said he tried to proposition her in a hotel steam room but that she escaped and he ‘ran out’.

Weinstein, who remains in Arizona maintaining a low profile since the accusations against him emerged in October, admitted the steam room incident but denied the violence.

‘Mr. Weinstein acknowledges making an awkward pass 25 years ago at Ms. Thurman in England after misreading her signals, after a flirtatious exchange in Paris, for which he immediately apologized and deeply regrets.

‘However, her claims about being physically assaulted are untrue. And this is the first time we have heard those details.

‘There was no physical contact during Mr. Weinstein’s awkward pass and Mr. Weinstein is saddened and puzzled as to “why” Ms. Thurman, someone he considers a colleague and a friend, waited 25 years to make these allegations public, noting that he and Ms. Thurman have shared a very close and mutually beneficial working relationship where they have made several very successful film projects together.

‘This is the first time we are hearing that she considered Mr. Weinstein an enemy and the pictures of their history tell a completely different story.

‘There will be more are detailed response later from Mr. Weinstein’s attorney, Ben Brafman.’

HARVEY WEINSTEIN DENIES ATTACKING UMA THURMAN

In response to Thurman’s claims, a representative for Weinstein sent photographs to DailyMail.com of the pair together in the years after the attack in an attempt to disprove her.

‘In accompanying statement, they said: ‘We have pulled a number of images that demonstrate the strong relationship Mr. Weinstein and Ms. Thurman had had over the years and we wish the New York Times would have published them.

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One of the images Weinstein’s reps shared which he says disproves Thurman’s claims is this one from a luncheon taken in January 2016

‘Mr. Weinstein acknowledges making an awkward pass 25 years ago at Ms. Thurman in England after misreading her signals, after a flirtatious exchange in Paris, for which he immediately apologized and deeply regrets. However, her claims about being physically assaulted are untrue. And this is the first time we have heard those details.

‘There was no physical contact during Mr. Weinstein’s awkward pass and Mr. Weinstein is saddened and puzzled as to “why” Ms. Thurman, someone he considers a colleague and a friend, waited 25 years to make these allegations public, noting that he and Ms. Thurman have shared a very close and mutually beneficial working relationship where they have made several very successful film projects together.

‘This is the first time we are hearing that she considered Mr. Weinstein an enemy and the pictures of their history tell a completely different story.

‘There will be more are detailed response later from Mr. Weinstein’s attorney, Ben Brafman.

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Why ‘Phantom Thread’ is one of the best movies of the year

Answer for Why ‘Phantom Thread’ is one of the best movies of the year

Why ‘Phantom Thread’ is one of the best movies of the year

Sunday, February 4, 2018

3:22 AM

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‘Phantom Thread’ follows the tumultuous love story of a 20th-century dressmaker. USA TODAY

Vicky Krieps and Daniel Day-Lewis in “Phantom Thread.”(Photo: Laurie Sparham/Focus Features)

“Phantom Thread” is a movie you see and say as you walk out of the theater in puzzled amazement “they don’t make movies like that anymore.”

It’s story is rather simple: a old bachelor named Reynolds Woodcock, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, is one of the most respected dress designers in 1950s London. He’s recently had his controlling sister and business partner Cyril, played by Lesley Manville, shoo off another potential muse.

At breakfast, in the country, Woodcock meets a tall, bashful waitress named Alma, played by Vicky Krieps. They click instantly, setting into motion a whirlwind romance that turns into a sandstorm that blinds both Woodcock and audiences momentarily.

Though set in a highly stylized world of fine fashion design, with both English and German royalty coming to Woodcock to design dresses that will take the breath away from even the most fashion illiterate among us, “Phantom Thread” is a love story through and through.

Instead of focusing on the heart-warming, lovey-dovey stuff romance films often focus on, writer and director Paul Thomas Anderson instead shows the less socially acceptable but still ever-present aspects of love: obsession, dominance, power dynamics and the ways one must change to truly let someone they love into their lives.

“Phantom Thread” just garnered six Academy Award nominations this week, including nominations for Best Director (Anderson), Best Actor (Day-Lewis) and Best Supporting Actress (Manville).

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‘The Shape of Water’ and ‘Get Out’ are among nine films nominated for the Academy Award for best picture. USA TODAY

Coming from the American filmmaker with maybe the most unquestioned pedigree with modern classics like “There will be Blood” and “Boogie Nights,” the glut of nominations may not initially seem surprising.

Considering the political climate that society is in now, the movie’s lack of direct appeal to #MeToo, #TimesUp, Black Lives Matter or other movements of our times makes the Oscar love surprising to me, but it shows that a film crafted with such skill and attention to detail can still get some spotlight.

The most obvious aspect of “Phantom Thread” to praise are its performances. With the movie centered around the love affair between Woodcock and Alma, the whole movie depends on its central cast.

Daniel Day-Lewis is a high-end dressmaker in “Phantom Thread.” (Photo: Focus Features)

After Woodcock and Alma fall for each other, Cyril becomes a sort of cold-hearted wall between the two. Not in a sadistic way, but a calculated way to keep her brother focused on the family business that employs dozens of seamstresses. Manville shines in her effortlessly curt performance.

Much of the movie is about Alma climbing the wall that is Cyril, and getting to the heart of the man she loves but also seizing some power in the family business. Soon she’s designing her own dresses, an act of quite rebellion.

Day-Lewis gives a rather toned-down but equally transforming performance. He translates the fashion designer’s obsession with his craft in subtle, coolly confident ways. As he sits at the breakfast table drawing a sketch of a new dress, his eyes dart up with a deadly stare toward Alma, who’s clanking dishes as she eats breakfast. It’s all distraction to Woodcock.

Lesley Manville was nominated for an Oscar Award in the Best Supporting Actress category for her role in “Phantom Thread.” (Photo: Laurie Sparham/Focus Features)

There are yells of anger from Woodcock, but they’re more fits and shouts of an immature man who throws a temper tantrum when he doesn’t get what he wants. This is one of the vital veins of humor in this movie. No, this isn’t a “laughs per minute” kind of movie, but one where humor sneaks up on you like Woodcock wearing a suit and vest over bright purple pajamas.

Krieps gives the most visually telegraphing performance of the movie, and is an equal to Day-Lewis in ever imaginable way. At first, Alma’s emotions are worn clearly in her face and posture. On their first “date,” as Woodcock measures her for a custom dress, he flatly states “you have no breasts.” She frowns and slouches like a heartbroken child.

As the movie progresses, their relationship evolves from something that seems like a artists and his muse relationship to where Alma is seizing power and control over Woodcock in both emotional and poisonously sadistic ways. It’s these moments where Alma seizes control, and the ways Woodcock becomes submissive, where the movie shines with an eerily delightful and tonally unique way.

Lesley Manville, seated left, and Vicky Krieps in a scene from “Phantom Thread.” (Photo: Courtesy of Laurie Sparham/Focus Features)

All of the movie is pulled forward with an alluring pace stitched together by Anderson. It lulls you into a slow, but meticulously constructed pace like that of a seamstress: yes, stitching together a dress may take a long time, but there are hundreds of small flicks of the wrist and needle movements in every minute of work. Anderson cuts to needles penetrating cloth, pricked fingers cutting fabric, intricate details of dresses all throughout the movie to show the amazing skill and craft that goes into high-end design.

It’s all drenched in the Oscar-nominated score composed by Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood. It’s a near constantly falling piano score that both lifts the movie with a romantic glow and lowers the movie into the dark shadows of its love story.

The poisonous leanings of the movie’s romance comes to a climax like no other movie I’ve seen, one that may leave you puzzled in the first moments, but emotionally awed in its wake. Just like its core romance, “Phantom Thread” will make you fall in love, break your heart and have you fall in love all over again.

4 out of 4 stars.

“Phantom Thread” is playing at FilmScene in Iowa City starting Friday.

Reach Zach Berg at 319-887-5412, zberg or follow him on Twitter at @ZacharyBerg.

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Toni Braxton Sparks Tamar And Vince Reconciliation Rumors: “I Think Those Two Are Going To Get Back Together If They Haven’t Already”

Toni Braxton is currently promoting her new Lifetime movie “Faith Under Fire.” The living legend has been on a press tour where she’s been giving insight on her and her sister’s relationships.

The oldest of the Braxton sisters visited a radio show recently where she was asked about her youngest sibling, Tamar Braxton, and the status of her marriage to estranged husband Vincent Herbert.
If you’ve been following the drama, you would know that the singer filed for divorce from Vince last year citing “irreconcilable differences.” After a volatile season of “Tamar and Vince,” viewers got to see some of the events that led to the reality star making the grave decision.

Off-camera, matriarch Evelyn Braxton, and siblings, Trina Traci and Towanda Braxton, alluded that there was much more going on between the couple. The famous family claimed that there was verbal and physical abuse witnessed from Vince’s end.
To add to the drama, the R&B songstress accused the producer of having an affair and allegedly fathering a child with another woman!

Much to our surprise, Tamar and Vince have been spotted hanging out together multiple times. They even reportedly took a romantic vacation to Mexico!

Their actions have left everyone wondering if they’re back together or if the divorce is still on.

Toni has something to say about that.
The 50-year-old explained to Angie Martinez: “I think Tamar and Vince are just going through a ‘I hate you, Jody’ phase. Remember the movie ‘Baby Boy’ That’s just their phase. I think those two are going to get back together if they haven’t already they love each other.”

To be fair, Tamar has never said “never” when asked if she will ever get back with her partner but she did take to social media to say that they weren’t together at the moment.

Celebrity Insider previously reported that some think that the entire thing was orchestrated as a publicity for the new seasons of “Tamar and Vince” and “Braxton Family Values.”